©Peter Hailey

Transfer of Learning Expertise

Organisations needs effective training programmes to ensure performance improvements while training institutions that produce high quality courses can only be perceived as worthy if the learning is translated into practice in the organisational work reality. Understanding how employees utilise their newly acquired knowledge is, therefore, a key aspect to look at. 

Research Background

In 2012 in the context of her MSc with Manchester University, Sophie Bruas conducted an operational research on Transfer of Learning. This study examined how learnt managerial coaching skills are transferred back into the workplace and what conditions support or impede this transfer.  The research looked at a specific international executive coaching programme delivered by a Kenyan training institute (Career Connections Ltd) to managers of three international for-profit organisations based in Kenya.

The Holton (1996) model and assessment tool (Holton et al 2000) supported the assessment of the transfer of coaching skill in this proposed case study. 

This particular model produces relevant information to adjust training and learning initiatives toward higher performance outcomes. Holton (1996) proposed a conceptual model focusing on performance (Fig. 1). The model suggests that the three primary outcomes of training intervention (learning, individual performance, and organizational result) can be conditioned by motivation to transfer, the transfer climate and transfer design.

 

An effective assessment Model

Research Highlighted

  • The central place of trainee motivation in transfer and the importance of self-directed factors towards individual performance.
  • An higher transfer in a period of 2 to 8 months following the training.
  • Weaknesses in the existing relationship between training, strategic directions of the three organisations and ‘on-the-job’ application of the skill probably related to an low transfer climate.
  • Need to strengthen learner readiness
  • Opportunity to link a strong individual motivation to transfer with a larger organisational strategy to contribute to an organisational performance.

©Peter Hailey